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John Dugan
peppinopen@gmail.com

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Does a Small Male Organ = Infertility?
Many men with a small male organ feel self-conscious or less of a man and may react negatively to a report that a small male organ is linked with infertility. But should they believe it?

BriefingWire.com, 10/12/2018 - Many men with a small male organ (or what they believe is a small male organ) worry about their male organ size. Society places an absurd emphasis on a big member, and this can make a man with a more modest endowment feel like “less of a man” – even though it is well established that factors like male organ health and skill are ultimately more important to sensual satisfaction than male organ size. Recent articles linking small male organ size to infertility have now added to the discomfort of many men with shorter members. But should they really be concerned about this?

The background

In October of 2018, the internet was flooded with articles and postings that shouted that a man with a small male organ is more likely to have infertility issues than a man with a big piece of equipment. What was the basis of this conclusion?

All the noise was generated by a study presented at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Conducted by scientists from the University of Utah, the study was a poster presentation (as opposed to a paper or oral presentation, which are generally longer and more detailed). For this study, the researchers looked at data from 815 men who were between the ages of 18 and 59 and who had visited a clinic between 2014 and 2017.

All of the subjects volunteered to be part of a Stretched Male Organ Length test, which estimates member length when tumescent, and so manhood length was part of the available data for this population. Of these men, 219 of them reported fertility issues as a reason for their visit to the clinic.

By scouring the data, the scientists were able to determine that the men with infertility problems had, on average, a smaller member than the men who did not have infertility problems. Thus, a small male organ was equated with infertility in the stories that circulated around the internet.

Not quite right

But that’s not quite right. For one thing, the average male organ size of the “fertile” males in the study was 5.27 inches; among the “infertile” group, the size was 4.92 inches, which while smaller than the other group, still falls in the average range of male member sizes rather than in the small range.

There are other variables that also must be considered. For example, the study makes assumptions about the actual fertility of the fertile group. And among those men seeking reproductive help, the data doesn’t indicate if the fertility issue may lie with the female partner instead of the male.

The lead author of the paper also makes it clear that this is an early study which raises more questions than it answers and that its conclusions shouldn’t be considered definitive. He states that looking at a much larger population might bring about different results, and that there are many men with shorter manhoods who are equally or more fertile than men with longer members.

So the long and short of it is that this is a study which indicates a possible correlation between manhood length and fertility – but it only lays the groundwork for more studies to look at this possibility and to determine if this result holds up.

Infertility is not a proven result of a small male organ, but members of all size benefit from attention to their health. Regular application of an excellent male organ health creme (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) helps maintain manhood care.

 
 
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